Know Your Rights: Importing a car

Question

I’m living in Ireland but I want to buy a second-hand car in the UK. What steps do I have to take when I bring the car to Ireland?

Answer

Within seven days of bringing the car to Ireland you must make an appointment to bring the car to your local National Car Testing Service (NCTS) centre in order to register it and pay Vehicle Registration Tax (VRT). See ncts.ie to book an appointment and for details of the documents you need to bring with you.

The car will be examined at the NCTS centre and the details will be used by Revenue to assess the amount of VRT payable, based on the value of the car. Revenue provides an online VRT Calculator that you can use to get an estimate of how much you will have to pay, see revenue.ie. You pay the VRT to the NCTS. You must complete the registration process within 30 days of the vehicle’s arrival in Ireland.

You will get a receipt for the VRT paid, showing the new registration number for your car. You must display this number on your car within three days. You can buy registration number plates at the NCTS centre or at a motor factors.

You will also get Form RF100, which you will need when you pay motor tax. To pay motor tax, you will also need to insure the car and have your insurance details. You can pay motor tax online at motortax.ie or at the Motor Taxation Office of your local authority.

After you have paid the motor tax, the Vehicle Registration Certificate will be issued to you by the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport.

If the car is four years old or more it must also undergo the National Car Test immediately.

Know Your Rights columns cover topical subjects every month in a question-and-answer format. They are published by the Citizens Information Board online and syndicated through Citizens Information Services to local newspapers around Ireland.

Further information is available from Citizens Information Centres and from the Citizens Information Phone Service, call 0761 07 4000.

Go for Life Grant Scheme to encourage older people to get active

The Go for Life Small Grant Scheme for Sport and Physical Activity for Older People is open for applications. The scheme is a joint initiative between Go for Life and the Irish Sports Council and aims to encourage older people to get active. It funds groups and clubs who cater for older people around the country so that they can buy equipment, run sports events or try new activities. Grants are between €250 and €700.

The closing date for applications is Friday, 26 September 2014.

Application forms are available on the Go for Life Small Grant Scheme page

 

Know Your Rights: After-School Child Care Scheme

Question

I’m unemployed and want to get back to work but my son is in primary school, which makes it difficult to be available all day for work or training. Can I get help with childcare for after-school hours?

Answer

If you go on an employment support scheme, go back to work or increase the number of days you work, you may be able to avail of the After-School Child Care Scheme. The scheme provides subsidised after-school childcare places with local childcare providers and is for primary school children aged 4 to 13.

To qualify for the scheme you must be getting Jobseeker’s Allowance, Jobseeker’s Benefit or One-Parent Family Payment, or be on an employment support programme. You must have been getting one of these qualifying payments (or a combination of the 4) for at least three months.

If you get a place, you can get after-school childcare for up to five days a week at a daily rate of €3 per child. The scheme includes a pick-up service. You can get up to 52 weeks of childcare while you remain eligible for the scheme. If you use the scheme during the school year, you can also get up to 10 weeks’ full-time childcare during the holidays.

You can apply and get more information at your local Intreo centre or social welfare office. You can apply up to 26 weeks after you start your new job, take up additional employment or start your employment support scheme.

The scheme is not available to Community Employment scheme participants who can apply for the CE Childcare Programme instead.

For vocational training with an Education and Training Board, the Childcare Education and Training Support Programme offers subsidised childcare.

If you don’t qualify for these schemes you may be eligible for the Community Childcare Subvention Programme, which offers childcare at a reduced cost to parents who are disadvantaged or in training, education or low paid work.

Know Your Rights columns cover topical subjects every month in a question-and-answer format. They are published by the Citizens Information Board online and syndicated through Citizens Information Services to local newspapers around Ireland.

Further information is available from Citizens Information Centres and from the Citizens Information Phone Service, call 0761 07 4000.

The Back to School Clothing and Footwear Allowance scheme is still open

The Back to School Clothing and Footwear Allowance helps you with the cost of clothing and other expenses for children in school. The Scheme will be open for applications until 30 September 2014. Currently the Department of Social Protection is processing claims received on 25 August 2014.

If you did not get an automatic payment you must apply for the Allowance. If any of your children are aged 18 or over you must apply for the Allowance for them and supply evidence that they are in second-level education (even if automatic payments have issued for other children in the family).

Application forms are available online (pdf).

Read more about the scheme on citizensinformation.ie.

What is e-Day?

E-Day (19 September 2014) is the date after which the public sector (government departments, local authorities and State agencies) will no longer write cheques to businesses and will no longer accept cheques from businesses. This only applies to businesses and e-Day will not affect consumer cheque usage, such as social welfare payments or pension payments. E-Day is part of the National Payments Plan which aims to increase electronic forms of payment such as debit cards and electronic banking in Ireland.

Read frequently asked questions about e-Day.

 You can also read the findings of an analysis of cheque use in Ireland from the Central Bank.

September is Irish Heart month

September is the Irish Heart Foundation’s Heart month. A new #SayWhenSooner campaign urging the public to cut down on alcohol was launched at the start of the month.

Alcohol consumption is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However a recent Health Research Board Report indicated that more than one million Irish adults are harmful drinkers and that Irish people underestimate how much they drink.

The Irish Heart Foundation has published a free magazine, Say When Sooner, which encourages adults to explore all the lifestyle issues related to alcohol, heart disease and stroke, explains how much is too much and discusses the topic of alcohol, calories and weight.

Download the magazine from irishheart.ie or you can call 1850 364 364 to be sent a copy.